Auckland Arts Festival is calling for proposals for the 2021 Festival and beyond.

Under new Artistic Director, Arts Laureate and Creative Entrepreneur Shona McCullagh (MNZM), Auckland Arts Festival is seeking creative projects and ideas of any artform and at any stage of development from Aotearoa’s professional artists, designers and thinkers – emerging or established.

“It’s important that AAF plays a role in assisting the resuscitation and recovery of the New Zealand arts sector post COVID-19, and inspire our audiences with the stunning world class work that is created right here in Aotearoa,” Shona says.

“Connection is more important than ever in our society following this crisis and during the predicted recession, and works of art reflect, heal, soothe and connect us.”

Auckland Arts Festival wants to work together with the artists, thought leaders and innovators of Aotearoa to bring inspiring ideas to life for the 2021 – 2024 festivals: Naku te rourou nau te rourou ka ora ai te iwi.

Genres could be design, theatre, music, dance, indoor or outdoor installations, street theatre, visual art, digital art, work in te reo Maori, work for children, communities and families; circus, cabaret, slam poetry, street art, photography, musicals and choral works, whakairo, thought leadership korero, or online projects.

The works could take place anywhere in Auckland – forests, beaches, parks, community centres, main stages, or roam around the city. Auckland Arts Festival also encourages works created by local communities, for local communities, led by artists and social innovators.

“I’m so impressed with the way our sector and our core funder Creative New Zealand has responded to this crisis, and the volume of creativity generated is simply astonishing” says Shona. “I can’t wait to see these ideas pour in.”

Hosted on the Auckland Arts Festival website, this Artist Call for Proposals in English and te reo Maori can be found at aaf.co.nz/call-for-proposals with a submission deadline of Monday 1 June.Ka timu te tai, ka pao te torea
When the tide recedes, the oyster catcher strikes